Think minimally

As it was the new year i decided I should at least make a list if not call them resolutions :). My list this year was to figure out what kind of training sessions i needed to fit in during the week to ensure i could compete in a slew of events this summer. The point being that i should ensure that I had the basic core fitness routines in there as well as some specific training sessions for the summer events.

So when it comes to project management sometimes you have to figure out what basic ‘things’ do you have to do to ensure a measure of success on the project. For instance no large project would be without a detailed schedule planning tasks, resources and dependencies. But what other controls ( and there are a lot to choose from ) would you select to be your basic tools. Here is my list :

Project Schedule
Change/Risk/Issue Log
Communications Plan
Requirements Document
Test Plan

There are certain things wrapped up in those documents such as a weekly status report as part of the communication plan and I would want so much more but i was curious to ask the question if you could only have the 5 basic tools to do the job what would you concentrate on??

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About chriscashell

I have been working in IT for most industries during my career and delivering change through solutions combining process re-engineering and software systems. This has involved taking a disparate group of people to form project teams and setting out on a mission to change the business and drive it forward to meet compelling goals. Building and being part of a successful team is a great experience and seeing organizations and individuals embrace change is a rewarding experience. I want to share my insights into those experiences and thoughts and find out what others believe can make change fun and enjoyable.
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2 Responses to Think minimally

  1. Jeff Bilbrey says:

    Chris, on the bigger projects I think we need to add in an ARCI model because it can be confusing for all the project contributors to know where decisions are made, who is making them, who is tracking them, who is collecting them, who is reporting on them.
    Nice post, btw.

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